Sunday, May 14, 2017

Seaton Soaker Race Report

Blogger (what I use to write this blog) offers some simple statistics regarding people who read or follow a blog.  All bloggers are interested in knowing if their blog is gaining audience or dwindling.  I'm no different.  Some posts have large readership, such as my post on shutting down the Creemore Vertical Challenge.  I understand that one, as it affected the plans of quite a few people.  The metrics also includes information on when a blog was read.  Example, I recently had quite a few hits on my Sulphur Springs race report from 2015.  Why, I asked myself?  The answer is simple; people are looking for information on a race they are thinking of doing, or are about to run.  It never dawned on me to do so, but what a great idea!

Yeah, I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed...

I've also noticed a trend in the timing when I write race reports.  Sunday morning, when I am normally out for a run.  Lee Anne ran 85K yesterday during the 12 hour Mind The Ducks race in New York.  This morning (about 13 hours after finishing her race) Lee Anne mentioned that she will be ready to run tomorrow morning and asked if I would join her...  Let's not bother to include my reply.  So I sit here, my legs in an advanced state of trash (Trashectomy?), unable to do more than type.

Since I plan to run 5 of these ridiculous ultra races over a 7 week period, I'll provide a condensed version for those who have no need to know the details:

The race went well, I was able to run the duration, was not as tired at 35K as I thought I would be after running 50K 2 weeks prior (Poison) and finished with a slow but respectful time of 6:49.

Seaton Soaker Race Report

Again, almost ideal running weather at Seaton.  This is filling me with foreboding, for upcoming races.  I don't ever recall having excellent weather for 3 races in a row.  The race started with a slight drizzle, then remained cool (8C?) and cloudy for the first 25K loop.  The sun came out for the second loop, so I doffed my fleece, although the temperature was never more than about 12C.  I ran with Nuun in my water bottle, which allowed me more freedom in what to eat and drink at the aid stations.  One is never perfectly certain, but I think I have found the correct schedule of fluid / nutrition / supplements intake for me.  I ate very little on the first loop, being more intent on wasting little time at the aid stations.  Seaton has none of the major climbs that are so generously sprinkled along the second half of Poison's 12.5K loop, but I was still surprised to see 3:12 for my first 25K loop.  Seaton has an ingenious course layout where you run on dry trail on the way out, yet there is a river crossing on the way back to the start/finish.  On the way out, there is a beaver dam, which means getting your shoes muddy, but with some care, you can avoid a soaking.  The course layout means that those in the 15K and 25K races get their feet wet about 3K from the finish, which translates into no blisters!

The 50K is a different story, as we have to run the course twice.  At the S/F (25K), I took the time to shed my socks and shoes and don dry socks and shoes.  Aside from a few muddy spots, the trail was in great condition.  I was hoping for this as I wanted to wear my road Hokas for the second loop.  The Hokas provide more cushioning, which translates into less wear and tear on the knees.  Off I went on the second loop, hoping to run at least until the turn-around (37.5K) without having to resort to walking.  More importantly, I was worried that the hamstring cramping that affected me at Poison might  resurface.  Again, wearing the road Hokas for the second loop meant my knees behaved themselves, resulting in less wear of my right quads on the downhills.  Using Nuun in my water bottle resulted in NO cramping during the 50K.  I had to slow for the last 5K, as I could feel the odd twinge that presages cramping.

Here is the 50K race nutrition strategy that worked for me:

Unit Type:  Late 50's human male @ 185 lbs., with 40+ years running and several injuries.

Calcium (Tums):  25K
Electrolyte:  In water bottle (hip belt)
Ibuprofen:  12.5K (one 200 mg tab) and 25K (one 200 mg tab)
Salt tab:  18K and 28K
Gel:  7K, 18K, 25K, 30K, 38K and 45K
Coke:  Most aid stations after 25K

I had a chocolate milk at 47K and although it sat funny in my stomach, seemed to help me get to the finish line.  I normally drink chocolate milk as a recovery drink.

At the turn-around (37.5K), I was still running well, albeit at a slow pace.  This surprised me because I normally take 4 - 6 weeks to recovery from a 50K.  When I run long 2 weeks after a 50K, I hit the wall very hard, around 35K.  Perhaps my 6K walk at Poison mitigated the normal issues running long shortly after a 50K, as technically, I only ran 40K, then walked 6K, then ran/walked 4K.  Who knows!  At about 38K, I hooked up with a youngster (she was 48) whose name escapes me.  Having no memory is normal for me, especially under the stress of a long race.  Since we were both in need of a pacer to see us to the finish, decided to run together.  We took turns leading.  A strange thing about leading a group (in this case, a group of 2) is that it feels great to do so while you are fresh, but at 45+K into a race, the opposite is true.  It sucks to be in front, desperately striving to maintain a healthy running pace.  At one point both sad and humorous, neither of us wanted to lead!

By 47K I had reached that point where I could not slow down, without resorting to a walk and increasing my pace would result in cramping.  We hit the river crossing where I ran across (I felt I would stop if I slowed down) and continue towards the finish.  The youngster caught up to me with about 1K to go, but as she was running at a pace I could not match, urged her to go ahead and finish strong.

I continued at a slow and steady pace, out of the woods onto a field, up a small hill, around the sports field, then towards the finish line.  The clock read 6:49:52.  I toyed briefly with sprinting to the line to finish under 6:50, but quickly realized that was a bad idea.  I had forgotten that my chip time would be a minute less than the gun time.  I finished in 6:49:36.

And so, 2 races down and hopefully at least another 6 to go in my own personal albatross known as the Norm Patenaude award.  Why and how people decide on these crazy ventures is beyond me!  Once more I have 2 weeks off (with good behaviour) before tackling the Sulphur Springs 50K.

Next year I'm going to run one 5K race...














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